Dr. Mark Blenner (CV)

CECAS Dean's Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Clemson University

Columbia University, Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, 2009
Manhattan College, B.S. Chemical Engineering, 2004

Research Interests: Metabolic Engineering, Synthetic Biology, Protein Engineering & Design, Biological Sensors & Switches, Biocatalysis, Biotechnology, Biorefining

207A Earle Hall, Box 340909
Clemson, SC 29634-0909
864-656-0290
blenner@clemson.edu


Research Narrative

Dr. Blenner did his doctoral work at Columbia University in the lab of Dr. Scott Banta. His work involved studying and engineering protein conformational change as a means of creating protein switches and biosensors. In particular, he focused on developing proteins that can act as allosteric scaffolds on which binding to an array of targets could then be engineered.

Soon after graduating, Dr. Blenner pursued postdoctoral studies with Dr. Timothy Springer at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children's Hospital. There, he applied evolutionary design methods to understand the structural effects of shear force on an important protein complex in clot formation. This work may lead to the development of new therapeutics for bleeding disorders, such as von Willebrand's Disease.

Currently, Dr. Blenner is interested in understanding how biological systems and biological molecules sensing and interact with their environment. We leverage these complex systems to address problems related to energy, sustainability and human health. Using protein engineering and metabolic engineering tools, the Blenner lab seeks to improve biosynthesis by creating adventageous synthetic regulatory networks.

Awards & Honors

CECAS Dean's Professorship Award (2016)
NASA Early Career Faculty Award (2015)
Air Force Young Investigator Program Award (2015)
NIH F32: Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (2011-2012)
American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship (2010)
The Draddy Medal for Excellence in Engineering (2004)
Omega Chi Epsilon Award (2004)
Howard Hughes Medical Institute Undergraduate Biological Science Grant (2002)